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Archive for the ‘Photographers You Should Know’ Category

Photographers You Should Know: Skip Bolen

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Skip Bolen’s images capture the heart and soul of his hometown New Orleans. His images document the people, places and spirit of The Big Easy. Bolen uses a mixture of film and digital imagery … black-and-whites with his Leica film camera and color with Canon digital equipment. He uses available light only and seeks to capture “the moment” that defines his subject.

James Brown at the House of Blues Sunset Strip in Los Angeles. (Photo Credit: Skip Bolen via Website)

James Brown at the House of Blues Sunset Strip in Los Angeles. (Photo Credit: Skip Bolen via Website)

From his Website,“(Bolen) is in constant pursuit of impromptu moments that display the heart and soul of what is Jazz, often capturing the intense concentration and sheer joy of the extemporaneous collaborative effort in the facial expressions of jazz musicians.”

To view Bolen’s Website, click here. Be sure to take time to browse through the jazz images; it’s well worth the time.

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Written by jeremyparce

April 1, 2009 at 11:42 am

Photographers You Should Know: Arnold E. Samuelson

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Information for this article was collected from the United States Holocaust Museum.

Starved prisoners, nearly dead from hunger, pose in concentration camp in Ebensee, Austria. (Photo Credit: Arnold Samuelson via National Archives)

Starved prisoners, nearly dead from hunger, pose in concentration camp in Ebensee, Austria. (Photo Credit: Arnold Samuelson via National Archives)

Arnold E. Samuelson’s images from World War II are a permanent reminder of the atrocities of the Holocaust. A photographer with the United States Army Signal Corps, Samuelson and his crew were among the first to photographically document Nazi crimes and the conditions found at the Lenzing and Ebensee concentration camps.

Prior to WWII, Samuelson was employed by Eastman Kodak Company office in Portland, Oregon. In 1942, Samuelson was inducted into the U.S. Army Air Corps (the precursor to the U.S. Air Force) and later joined the Signal Corps a year later.

Samuelson began documenting the Allied forces battles in France and Belgium about three months after D-Day. He saw combat at the Battle of the Bulge and in 1945, he was given command of the 123rd Combat Unit where he was in command of two motion picture cameramen and two still photographers.

Photographers You Should Know: Alfred Eisenstaedt

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Information for this article was collected from Art Scene California

Photographer Alfred Eisenstaedt is known as the “father of modern photojournalism” and was one of the most prolific candid photographers of the 20th Century.

‘V-J Day in Times Square,’ is one of Eisenstaedt’s most famous photographs. The image was made August 14, 1945 in Times Square, New York City. (Photo Credit: Alfred Eisenstaedt, via Life Magazine)

‘V-J Day in Times Square,’ is one of Eisenstaedt’s most famous photographs. The image was made August 14, 1945 in Times Square, New York City. (Photo Credit: Alfred Eisenstaedt, via Life Magazine)

The German-born photographer was born in 1898 and started photography at the age of 14 with an Eastman Kodak Folding Camera. In 1927, at the age of 29, he sold his first photograph and in 1928 he began working for Pacific and Atlantic Photo’s Berlin office as a freelance photographer.

By 1935, Eisenstaedt migrated to the United States and in 1936, he became a founding staff photographer for Life Magazine.

He believed in using relatively little equipment in order to be as unobtrusive as possible. Near the end of his career, Eisenstaedt said, “My style hasn’t changed much in all these sixty years. I still use, most of the time, existing light and try not to push people around. I have to be as much a diplomat as a photographer. People often don’t take me seriously because I carry so little equipment and make so little fuss. When I married in 1949, my wife asked me. ‘But where are your real cameras?’ I never carried a lot of equipment. My motto has always been, ‘Keep it simple.’”

Photographers You Should Know: Manuel Álvarez Bravo

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Information for this article was received from The Getty Museum and the Museum of Modern Art, New York.

‘Figure of Christ,’ Asociación Manual Álvarez Bravo AC via The J. Paul Getty Trust

‘Figure of Christ,’ Asociación Manual Álvarez Bravo AC via The J. Paul Getty Trust

Manuel Álvarez Bravo was a self-taught Mexican photographer from a family of artists. Although trained in the classic art disciplines, Álvarez Bravo excelled at his photographic work. Born in 1902 in post-revolution Mexico City, Mexico, his career spanned nearly 80 years of professional photography and teaching.

Álvarez Bravo is considered one of the leading people in the development of photography and one of the greatest Mexican artists of the 20th century.

His early success in photography began in 1925 when he won first place in a local photographic competition in Oaxaca. He returned to Mexico City where he began socializing with artists from various disciplines. He met photographer Edward Weston, who encouraged Álvarez Bravo to continue his study in photography.

Álvarez Bravo taught photography at the San Carlos Academy during the 1930s and continued his work until his death in 2002.

His primary photographic interests include nude forms, folk art, and burial rituals.

Photographers You Should Know: Dorothea Lange

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'Migrant Mother, Florence Owens Thompson.' (Photo Credit: Dorothea Lange, via U.S. National Archives)

'Migrant Mother, Florence Owens Thompson.' (Photo Credit: Dorothea Lange, via U.S. National Archives)

Information for this article came from the Oakland Museum of California.

Photographer Dorothea Lange was a major influence in the development of modern documentary photography. Her touching and poignant photographs of people during the American Great Depression for the Farm Security Administration shaped the way people viewed the hardships and struggles of American farmers and migrant workers.

Lange’s photographs showed her compassion for her subjects and her ability to capture the essence of the subject.

Lange began in the 1920s as a commercial portrait photographer in San Francisco. Some of her earliest documentary work was of Native Americans made on her trips to the American Southwest with her first husband, painter Maynard Dixon.

Lange’s Great Depression photos show the struggles of migrant workers who were leaving the American Midwest Dust Bowl, and moving to California to find work and start a new life.

During World War II, Lange began documenting Japanese Americans who were sent to internment camps, and women and minorities working in wartime industries.

Photographers You Should Know: Edward S. Curtis

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Information for this article was received from the Smithsonian Institution.

Edward S. Curtis is one of the most widely recognized, and sometimes criticized, photographers of American Native people. For more than three decades, he traveled the American West and Alaska photographing Native Americans.
Born February 16, 1868, in Wisconsin, Curtis took an interest in photography – then an emerging medium – at an early age. He built his first camera when he was a teenager and by the age of 19, he owned part interest in a photography studio in Seattle, where his family had moved.

‘Sioux Chiefs.’ (Photo Credit: Edward S. Curtis via the Smithsonian Institution)

‘Sioux Chiefs.’ (Photo Credit: Edward S. Curtis via the Smithsonian Institution)

In his twenties, Curtis began photographing Native American in the Puget Sound area as they dug for clams and mussels. One of his earliest photographs of Native Americans was of Princess Angeline, the daughter of Sealth, the Suquamish chief after whom Seattle was named.

In 1899, at the age of 31, Curtis became the official photographer of the Harriman Expedition into Alaska. After this, he began his 30-year quest of documenting Native Americans in the United States.

Curtis funded his expeditions personally – acquiring a tremendous amount of debt – and by soliciting funds for his work. Some of his donors included President Theodore Roosevelt and railroad tycoon John Pierpont Morgan.

Curtis documented nearly 80 Native American tribes and made nearly 40,000 photographs and 10,000 recording of Native American speech and music. Like most scholars of his time, Curtis believed the Native American culture would be lost as Native Americans were brought into the mainstream culture. He wanted to create both an artistic and academic volume of work before the cultures “vanished.”

Curtis died in 1952 and the bulk of his work was forgotten. During the 1960s and 1970s, however, his work was “rediscovered” and is now recognized as one of the “most significant records of Native culture ever produced.”

Photographers You Should Know: George W. Ackerman

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Information for this article came from the U.S. Archives
George W. Ackerman was one of the many U.S. government-employed photographers who made images during the Great Depression. Ackerman started with the Bureau of Plant Industry for an annual salary of $900.

Unlike his peers, Ackerman’s photographs often depicted farmers utilizing modern farm machinery and the modern advances that had come to the U.S. agriculture community. He traveled the nation, documenting how farmers labored. Many of his peers during the Depression often focused on the poverty and difficult conditions many rural people faced, yet Ackerman showed hope in his images by focusing on the positive things that were happening in rural America.

'Farm Family Listening to Their Radio.' (Photo Credit: George W. Ackerman, August 15, 1930 National Archives and Records Administration, Records of the Extension Service)

'Farm Family Listening to Their Radio.' (Photo Credit: George W. Ackerman, August 15, 1930 National Archives and Records Administration, Records of the Extension Service)

Ackerman said he tried “to paint the rural scene as I saw it, modern and up-to-date in many respects.”

During his tenure in federal service, Ackerman made an estimated 50,000 photographs during his 40-year career with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, many of which appeared in private and government agriculture publications. Often, those images were not credited to him.