BrickHouse Photo School

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Posts Tagged ‘canon

Canon and The National Center for Missing & Exploited Children Partner to Make Children Safer

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Canon U.S.A., Inc., and The National Center for Missing & Exploited Children recently took the field to help raise greater awareness of issues related to locating missing children. It will be Canon’s sixth annual promotional night at Yankee Stadium, when the Yankees take on the Baltimore Orioles.

During the pre-game ceremony, Mark Haga, executive vice president and chief financial officer, Canon U.S.A., presented John Walsh, co-founder of NCMEC and host of the television series “America’s Most Wanted,” with a $575,000 check, representing the cumulative amount of money donated by Canon U.S.A..

“Canon’s continued commitment to protecting children is reflected in our corporate philosophy, Kyosei – all people, regardless of race, religion, or culture, harmoniously living and working together into the future,” said Joe Adachi, president and chief executive officer, Canon U.S.A. “We are very proud that Canon has worked with NCMEC and the New York Yankees to bring into focus the many ways digital cameras, printers and photos can play a key role in helping to locate missing children. To date, Canon’s support of NCMEC has contributed to the recovery of 336 missing children.”

For more than a decade, Canon U.S.A. and NCMEC, who are celebrating 25 years of recovering children, have collaborated to educate the public about the growing issue of missing children. The Canon4Kids program sponsored by Canon U.S.A. and NCMEC, donates products to help law enforcement quickly disseminate photos and information about missing children, produces Public Service Announcements with missing children photos, and educates parents about tips for taking and maintaining updated photos of their children.

“A good current photograph is the single most important tool in the search for a missing child,” said Ernie Allen, president and CEO of NCMEC. “This is why we are so grateful that Canon, a leader in digital imaging, is working so closely with us. Through photography, technology and education, Canon and NCMEC are saving lives, keeping children safe and reuniting families.”

As part of the Canon4Kids program, more than 1,925 pieces of donated Canon equipment (digital cameras, fax-phones, printers and scanners) have been distributed to law enforcement agencies in all 50 states and Puerto Rico. The program also includes the placement of public service announcements with photographs of missing children in newspapers and magazines across the country to help in the recovery process.

About the National Center for Missing & Exploited Children
The National Center for Missing & Exploited Children is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization. Since it was established by Congress in 1984, the organization has operated the toll-free 24-hour national missing children’s hotline which has handled more than 2,377,000 calls. It has assisted law enforcement in the recovery of more than 138,500 children. The organization’s CyberTipline has handled more than 685,700 reports of child sexual exploitation and its Child Victim Identification Program has reviewed and analyzed more than 22,761,000 child pornography images and videos. The organization works in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Justice’s office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention.

To learn more about NCMEC, call its toll-free, 24-hour hotline at 1-800-THE-LOST or visit its Web site .

About Canon’s Sponsorship of the New York Yankees
Canon has been a sponsor of the New York Yankees since 2000. In 2004, Canon increased its presence at Yankee Stadium with a sign on the left field outfield wall, further enhancing its brand presence for millions of fans. In addition, Canon continues to receive exposure on rotating signage behind home plate. Canon’s sponsorship also includes the designation as “Official Digital Camera, Copier, SLR Camera and Printer of the New York Yankees.”

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Written by jeremyparce

May 21, 2009 at 12:06 am

Canon Presents Its Fourth Annual ‘Photography in the Parks’ Photo Contest

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I will often publish media releases related to photography on this blog in order to help keep you informed. These media releases are created by the respective companies. I edit the releases for space as needed.

As springtime rolls in, Canon U.S.A., Inc., is encouraging Americans to visit their national parks and photograph their beauty with its fourth annual Canon Photography In The Parks Photo Contest. The contest invites photography enthusiasts, from May 15th to September 30th, 2009, to enter by submitting their “Inspirational Nature Images,” the theme for this year’s contest. Photos taken at any park or monument in America can be entered through the Canon Digital Learning Center Web site. New this year, Canon will have two contest divisions for photographers between the ages of 13 and 17, and a separate division for adults ages 18 and older. This will enhance the contest experience by allowing aspiring teen photographers to compete amongst their peers.

“Through our Photography in the Parks Photo Contest, we have seen a great number of awe-inspiring outdoor images submitted from around the country. It is during these beautiful spring and summer months that we all should take the time to go outside and enjoy all that nature has to offer,” stated Yuichi Ishizuka, senior vice president and general manager, Canon U.S.A. “As an environmentally conscious organization, we encourage everyone to enjoy the beauty of nature, and work to protect it.”

After entering their photos through the Canon Digital Learning Center, potential contest winners will have the opportunity to forward an e-postcard of their submitted images to friends and family as a fun way to share their photographs. Winning photographers from the Photography in the Parks Photo Contest will receive some of Canon’s hottest photographic equipment. Along with some of Canon’s hottest equipment, the Grand Prize winner will receive a trip to a National Park.

As part of Canon’s Parks Program, a team of photographers will be touring four National Parks from June through August. At each park, the Canon team will host free photography workshops and provide Canon’s top-of-the-line camera equipment for participants to use at no charge. Each class will teach various photography techniques and explore many of the camera functions as participants take a walking tour of the park. Visit www.usa.canon.com/parks for details and a schedule of workshops.

Online visitors and Web surfers are encouraged to browse the Canon Digital Learning Center and take advantage of the various educational resources that Canon has to offer for novices and advanced photographers alike. The Canon Digital Learning Center provides a schedule for a wide variety of Live Learning classes across the country with renowned photographers as well as online resources and tips. The site also features online tutorials for beginners and professionals to learn their way around a digital SLR camera and inkjet printer and unlock the full creative control of digital photography.

Canon Launches New Educational Program for Current and Prospective EOS Users

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I will often publish media releases related to photography on this blog in order to help keep you informed. These media releases are created by the respective companies. I edit the releases for space as needed.

Canon recently announced the launch of Canon Live Learning, a new on-site education program targeted towards photographers who currently use or are interested in Canon’s popular line of EOS photographic products. Canon Live Learning (CLL) will offer high-quality classes and workshops conducted by a number of the industry’s leading professional photographers, Canon’s Explorers of Light. CLL attendees will learn how to get the most out of their gear while also having the opportunity to try out Canon’s latest line of EOS products.

“Through the Canon Live Learning program we are hoping to empower and inspire our customers to further enhance their skills and passion for the art of imaging,” said Yuichi Ishizuka, senior vice president and general manager, Consumer Imaging Group, Canon U.S.A. “Canon Live Learning adds value to the experience of owning and using Canon photographic products.”

CLL will consist of two distinct educational opportunities: EOS Essentials and EOS Extras. EOS Essentials is a two-day weekend program which will start on Saturday with a mini-conference for participants to learn about a variety of topics, followed by optional hands-on workshops. On Sunday, participants will be organized in smaller groups and take part in workshops conducted by a Canon Explorer of Light professional photographer. The EOS Extras program is a series of exciting, two-day hands-on workshops with a Canon Explorer of Light. Participants will go on location in order to learn about photographic techniques and try Canon’s latest EOS equipment. Potential participants can go online to learn more about each program and register at this Web page.

EOS Essentials
The Canon Live Learning EOS Essentials program is ideal for photographers who are interested in learning how to get the most out of their EOS and other photography equipment. During the first day of the program, four topics will be covered, at approximately 90 minutes per topic. Canon Explorers of Light, local professional photographers and Canon instructors will present each topic through an inspirational blend of on-screen content and live demonstrations. After each presentation, questions and answers will be encouraged to further discussion and elicit new ideas. Topics in 2009 will include: “Creative Lighting with Speedlites,” “HD Video with EOS DSLRs,” “Landscape/Nature Photography,” and “Maximizing Your EOS.”

The optional second day of the EOS Essentials program will offer a choice between two different hands-on workshops, each with an attending Explorer of Light photographer and other professional instructors. These workshops will be interactive and limited to 16 participants each. Participants will also be able to try out Canon’s latest line of EOS products during these workshops. Workshop topics will vary according to the location, and are posted on the Canon Live Learning Web site.

In 2009, the Canon EOS Essentials program will be held in the following cities:

New York, N.Y. May 30th – May 31st
Chicago, Ill. June 13th – June 14th
Los Angeles, Calif. June 20th – June 21st
San Francisco, Calif. July 18th – July 19th
Boston, Mass. TBD
Seattle, Wash TBD
Atlanta, Ga. TBD
Dallas, TX TBD

Confirmed Canon Explorers of Light who are scheduled to deliver at least one program are: Vincent Laforet, Bruce Dorn, Bob Davis, George Lepp, Darrell Gulin, Adam Jones and Jennifer Wu. Various local professional photographers, such as Carol Dragon, Richard Koci Hernandez and Paul Kennedy, are also scheduled to participate. Canon U.S.A. instructors will include Brian Matsumoto, Carl Peer and James Rose.

All EOS Essentials presentations will be shown using Canon REALiS multimedia projectors for superb image quality, and each location will feature an equipment demonstration area where participants will be able to handle and try a wide range of Canon imaging products, including EOS cameras, EF lenses and Canon imagePROGRAF and PIXMA Pro photo printers.

EOS Extras
In addition to the EOS Essentials program, Canon Live Learning is offering EOS Extras where participants will have the opportunity to take part in a weekend of instruction on location at an interesting site with a Canon Explorer of Light. In this program, participants will get even more extensive hands-on experience and come away with an increased knowledge and understanding of their Canon EOS equipment. Participants will have the opportunity to use additional EOS equipment as well. The first EOS Extras weekend program is scheduled for June 6th through June 7th in Aspen, Colorado with Explorer of Light Tyler Stableford. Additional destinations will be announced in the coming weeks.

Written by jeremyparce

May 12, 2009 at 10:40 pm

Canon USA and the Arbor Day Foundation Set to Sow the Canon Forest Program

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I will often publish media releases related to photography on this blog in order to help keep you informed. These media releases are created by the respective companies. I edit the releases for space as needed.

Helping consumers make a difference in the environment, Canon U.S.A, Inc., a leader in digital imaging, today announced it will bring back the Canon Forest Program, working with the Arbor Day Foundation, this Earth Day.

Beginning on May 1 and running through August 31, for every 10 Canon Generation Green products registered on the Canon U.S.A. website, Canon will plant a tree through the Arbor Day Foundation. Introduced on Earth Day last year, the Canon Forest Program was so successful that the original target date was met three weeks early and 20,000 trees were planted throughout the U.S. In addition to the product registration campaign, Canon will plant one tree for every new hardware item purchased from the Canon eStore from April 23 – May 7.

“Canon’s commitment to the environment is an inherent part of our corporate philosophy of Kyosei – all people, regardless of race, religion, or culture, harmoniously living and working together into the future,” said Yuichi Ishizuka, senior vice president and general manager, Consumer Imaging Group, Canon U.S.A. “The smallest of efforts can add up significantly when everyone participates, ultimately helping us achieve our collective goal of a sustainable environment.”

Canon’s Generation Green line of products, which includes its PIXMA Inkjet Printers, imageFORMULA DR-Series scanners, imageCLASS printer products and CanoScan and LiDEscanners, offers paper-saving technology and energy-saving measures, as well as minimal product packaging, all helping to contribute to the overall sustainability of the environment.

Canon believes that accountability is vital to its sustainability initiatives; this is why Canon, along with the Arbor Day Foundation, will enable customers to keep track of the program’s progress by visiting http://www.usa.canon.com/green, when the program commences on May 1. Here visitors can register their new and existing Generation Green purchases, view a tree counter that will show where and how many trees have been planted, learn more about how they can maximize the efficiency of their Canon Generation Green Products and other features on the site.

In addition to Generation Green, Canon U.S.A. protects future generations by helping to preserve nature’s most valuable resources through the support of a wide range of environmental education and conservation initiatives, including the Canon Envirothon, one of North America’s largest high school environmental education competitions; the PBS NATURE series; and scientific research and educational programs at Yellowstone National Park. Canon also established the industry’s first and longest-running Toner Cartridge Return Program in 1990. To date, more than 150,000 tons of toner cartridges have been diverted from landfills. For more information, visit www.usa.canon.com/environment.

Written by jeremyparce

April 22, 2009 at 3:53 pm

Trip Through the Canon Store: Wide-Angle Lenses

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A lens is a tool. Most people forget that for some reason but simply enough, a lens is a tool that we use to make an image. Like all tools, at the risk of overextending the analogy, the better the tool, the better the finished project.

In our last installment, we discussed the basic facts related to lenses and then looked at Canon’s ultra-wide zoom lenses. If you didn’t read that article, you really should because it explains the basic mechanics of how a lens works.

Today, we’re going to look at the company’s fixed focal length, wide-angle lenses. I have always been a fan of prime lenses. Prime lenses are defined as lenses with a fixed focal length versus zoom lenses which have a range of focal lengths. I like prime lenses because they are generally very well made and typically cost less than zoom lenses. I also like prime lenses because they typically have a larger maximum aperture than zooms and often weigh less than zoom lenses.

There are, however, advantages to using zoom lenses. Zooms obviously cover a broader focal range, thus eliminating the need to carry multiple lenses. If you purchase a zoom, I highly suggest buying one that has a fixed maximum aperture throughout the entire zoom range. Although more costly, they are worth the investment.

Canon’s Wide-Angle Lens Selection
Canon currently manufactures nine prime wide-angle lenses. Of the nine, one lens is a fisheye and three of the lenses are L-series.

EF 14mm f/2.8L II USM: This pro-series lens has an amazing 114-degree angle of view and is a perfect lens for architectural applications. The lens also features better optical elements that reduce problems in edge-to-edge sharpness. It is dust- and moisture-proof and the ultrasonic motor (that’s the USM designation) means you’ll get faster and more responsive autofocus. This lens isn’t cheap, though. Expect to pay between $2000-$2200 US for this pro-series lens.

EF 14mm f/2.8L II USM: This pro-series lens has an amazing 114-degree angle of view and is a perfect lens for architectural applications. The lens also features better optical elements that reduce problems in edge-to-edge sharpness. It is dust- and moisture-proof and the ultrasonic motor (that’s the USM designation) means you’ll get faster and more responsive autofocus. This lens isn’t cheap, though. Expect to pay between $2000-$2200 US for this pro-series lens.

Canon's EF 15mm f/2.8 Fisheye lens: If you’ve never seen images made with a fisheye lens, you’ve missed out. The fisheye lens has a 180-degree angle of view and barrel distortion giving the image a curved look. With its f/2.8 maximum aperture, this lens works well for photographing fast-action subjects and with its 8 inch minimum focus distance, you can get really close and really wide. This is a specialized lens and you probably won’t use it everyday. But when you need to give your images a different look, this is a go-to lens to have in your camera bag. The lens isn’t priced too bad, either. You can expect to find this lens for about $625-$725 US.

Canon's EF 15mm f/2.8 Fisheye lens: If you’ve never seen images made with a fisheye lens, you’ve missed out. The fisheye lens has a 180-degree angle of view and barrel distortion giving the image a curved look. With its f/2.8 maximum aperture, this lens works well for photographing fast-action subjects and with its 8 inch minimum focus distance, you can get really close and really wide. This is a specialized lens and you probably won’t use it everyday. But when you need to give your images a different look, this is a go-to lens to have in your camera bag. The lens isn’t priced too bad, either. You can expect to find this lens for about $625-$725 US.

EF 20mm f/2.8 USM: This is a nice lens to have if you need to get wide and maintain a big maximum aperture. Plus, this lens is fairly well priced. You can expect to pick one up for about $450 US.

EF 20mm f/2.8 USM: This is a nice lens to have if you need to get wide and maintain a big maximum aperture. Plus, this lens is fairly well priced. You can expect to pick one up for about $450 US.

EF 24mm f/1.4L II USM: This is one of my favorite wide-angle lenses. First of all, it produces needle-sharp images from corner-to-corner. Second, its ultra-fast f/1.4 maximum aperture is ideal for photojournalists who may be shooting in tight spaces with less-than-ideal lighting. Also, this lens offers extremely pleasing bokeh (the out-of-focus, soft blur when using a shallow depth of field). The ultrasonic motor allows for highly responsive and quiet autofocus. Again, being a pro-series lens, the EF 24mm f/1.4L II USM isn’t cheap. Expect to pay between $1700-$1800 US.

EF 24mm f/1.4L II USM: This is one of my favorite wide-angle lenses. First of all, it produces needle-sharp images from corner-to-corner. Second, its ultra-fast f/1.4 maximum aperture is ideal for photojournalists who may be shooting in tight spaces with less-than-ideal lighting. Also, this lens offers extremely pleasing bokeh (the out-of-focus, soft blur when using a shallow depth of field). The ultrasonic motor allows for highly responsive and quiet autofocus. Again, being a pro-series lens, the EF 24mm f/1.4L II USM isn’t cheap. Expect to pay between $1700-$1800 US.

EF 24mm f/2.8: This lens is really ideal for students interested in photography but not ready - or able - to make a huge financial investment. The lens has a fast maximum aperture of f/2.8 and a great focal length to get into wide-angle photography. It has a minimum focus distance of 10 inches, which lets you get fairly close to your subject. You can pick this lens up for about $310 US.

EF 24mm f/2.8: This lens is really ideal for students interested in photography but not ready - or able - to make a huge financial investment. The lens has a fast maximum aperture of f/2.8 and a great focal length to get into wide-angle photography. It has a minimum focus distance of 10 inches, which lets you get fairly close to your subject. You can pick this lens up for about $310 US.

EF 28mm f/2.8: This lens is considered a good standard wide-angle lens. It’s a nice walk around lens because its both lightweight (185g) and offers a nice focal length for general photographic work. Again, this isn’t an expensive lens. You can find one for about $200 US.

EF 28mm f/2.8: This lens is considered a good standard wide-angle lens. It’s a nice walk around lens because its both lightweight (185g) and offers a nice focal length for general photographic work. Again, this isn’t an expensive lens. You can find one for about $200 US.

EF 35mm f/1.4L USM: This is another great lens I enjoy using. It has a super fast maximum aperture of f/1.4 and is a really well-made lens. For those of you who don’t own a full frame camera, which many Canon digital cameras have a 1.6x magnification ratio, this lens is a really nice portrait lens because it gives you an actual focal length of 56mm. The bokeh effect of this lens is also aesthetically pleasing. Like most pro, L-series lenses, this one isn’t too cheap. Expect to part with $1200-$1400 US for this lens.

EF 35mm f/1.4L USM: This is another great lens I enjoy using. It has a super fast maximum aperture of f/1.4 and is a really well-made lens. For those of you who don’t own a full frame camera, which many Canon digital cameras have a 1.6x magnification ratio, this lens is a really nice portrait lens because it gives you an actual focal length of 56mm. The bokeh effect of this lens is also aesthetically pleasing. Like most pro, L-series lenses, this one isn’t too cheap. Expect to part with $1200-$1400 US for this lens.

EF 35mm f/2: This is a less-priced lens that still offers the 35mm focal length and a fast aperture. Although it’s not as solidly built as the EF 35 f/1.4L USM lens, it still offers the photographer a compact, lightweight and relatively low-cost lens. You can purchase this lens for about $300 US.

EF 35mm f/2: This is a less-priced lens that still offers the 35mm focal length and a fast aperture. Although it’s not as solidly built as the EF 35 f/1.4L USM lens, it still offers the photographer a compact, lightweight and relatively low-cost lens. You can purchase this lens for about $300 US.

EF 28mm f/1.8 USM: A nice all-around lens, this model offers a super fast maximum aperture and sharp edge-to-edge images across the aperture range. A good student lens, you can purchase this model for about $450 US.

EF 28mm f/1.8 USM: A nice all-around lens, this model offers a super fast maximum aperture and sharp edge-to-edge images across the aperture range. A good student lens, you can purchase this model for about $450 US.

Sample image from the Canon EF 14mm f/2.8L II USM lens. (Photo Credit: Image from Canon)

Sample image from the Canon EF 14mm f/2.8L II USM lens. (Photo Credit: Image from Canon)

For our next installment, we’ll discuss Canon’s standard and medium telephoto prime lenses. Good luck and keep shooting!

Sample image from the Canon EF 24mm f/1.4L II USM lens. (Photo Credit: Image from Canon)

Sample image from the Canon EF 24mm f/1.4L II USM lens. (Photo Credit: Image from Canon)

Sample image from the Canon's EF 15mm f/2.8 Fisheye lens. (Photo Credit: Image from Canon)

Sample image from the Canon's EF 15mm f/2.8 Fisheye lens. (Photo Credit: Image from Canon)

Trip Through the Canon Store: Ultra-Wide Zoom Lenses

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A lens is a tool. Most people forget that for some reason but simply enough, a lens is a tool that we use to make an image. Like all tools, at the risk of overextending the analogy, the better the tool, the better the finished project. I hear from people asking about lenses and I spend some time trying to explain them. I will go into great detail about lenses in future posts but for the sake of time, let’s make a few things clear:

  • Lenses are Measured in Focal Length: The focal length is the definition of how strongly an optic system focuses (converges) or diffuses (diverges) light. The focal length is measured, as a rule, in millimeters and it is the measurement from the optical center of the lens to the focal point on the image sensor (or film).
  • Focal Lengths Based on 35mm Film Standards: With the popularity of 35mm cameras, the focal length is based on that measurement. IF you have a camera that has a image sensor smaller than a 35mm camera’s film surface, which most digital camera image sensors ARE smaller than film, there is a multiplier you must use. For instance, the image sensor on a Canon EOS Rebel XS is 22.2mm x 14.8mm. The dimensions of 35mm film is 35mm wide (actually, it’s 36mm wide but you have to take in consideration spacing between the frames and room for the perforations). So, the EOS Rebel XS in our scenario has a magnification rate of about 1.6x.
  • Do the Math: So if you purchase a 20mm lens, it would be at 20mm on a film camera or 20mm x 1.6 or 32mm – in case you don’t want to do the math – on a digital camera.
  • This is Photography, Not Math. Why is it Important?: Well, simply put, if your camera has a magnification ratio, then you’re not getting as wide of an angle as you want. Let’s say you really want a 14mm lens because you’re shooting wide landscapes or large groups. OK, but your camera has a 1.5x magnification factor. So, you’re really getting a 21mm lens.
  • What are the Alternatives: Camera and lens manufacturers have settled the problem for the most part. They have made “full-frame” sensors that are close enough to the size of 35mm film that the magnification ratio has little impact. Secondly, these companies have also made “digital specific” lenses that already calculate the magnification ratio into the millimeter measurement. For instance, the Canon 5D Mark II is full frame, so if you buy a lens, you’re going to get the focal length as measured for film. Also, Nikon makes full-frame cameras (called FX format), which includes the D3 and D700 plus they make DX format (digital specific) lenses, which already account for the magnification.

Enough with the math, right? Just remember, unless you’re buying a digital-specific lens or your camera is full frame, the focal length of you lens is multiplied by the magnification factor.

Aperture Settings
Professional grade cameras, for the most part, have a fixed aperture value versus a variable aperture. Fixed aperture lenses have a constant maximum aperture throughout the zoom range. A variable aperture lens changes its maximum aperture in regards to the zoom. For instance, a 28-70mm f/4-f/5.6 lens means at 28mms, the maximum aperture is f/4 whereas at the high-end of the zoom range (70mm) the maximum aperture has reduced to f/5.6.

Variable aperture lenses are not normally as well constructed as the fixed aperture counterparts. The advantages, however, tend to be less weight and lower cost. Remember, the aperture value effects the depth-of-field you can achieve.

Canon’s Ultra-Wide Lenses
Canon makes three ultra-wide lenses: the EF 16-35mm f/2.8L II USM; the EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM; and the EF 17-40mm f/4L USM.

16to35

The Canon EF 16-35mm f/2.8L II USM

10to22

The Canon EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM

17to40

The Canon EF 17-40mm f/4L USM

EF 16-35mm f/2.8L II USM
This pro-level lens (Canon’s professional lenses typically have the “L” designation) is perfect for those who need wide angle capabilities and a big maximum aperture. On any Canon digital that does not have full frame, this lens will give you the focal length equivalent of a 26-56mm lens while still retaining the f/2.8 aperture value. This lens is ideal for photojournalists, landscape photographers and wedding photographers who shoot big groups in often poorly lit churches. It’s a relatively heavy lens (640 grams) mainly because it needs big glass for the fast shutter. The ultrasonic motor (that’s the USM designation) delivers fast and silent autofocusing. This isn’t a cheap lens, either. Expect to pay nearly $1500-$1900 US for this piece of glass. Is it worth it? Depends. If you’re interested in photojournalism or documentary photography or have a goal of becoming a wedding photographer, then yes. This piece of glass will be around to stay.

EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM
This consumer-grade lens is designed specifically for Canon digital cameras that LACK full frame sensors, so basically most Canon cameras (You can tell by the EF-S designation that it’s for digital specific cameras). This lens is the equivalent to a 16-35mm zoom lens. This is also a variable aperture lens, meaning the biggest aperture setting is f/3.5 at 10mm and at 22mm it’s f/4.5. It’s a little more than half the weight of the EF 16-35mm f/2.8L II USM (385 grams). This lens will not, however, cost as much. You can find this lens for about $750-$850 US.

EF 17-40mm f/4L USM
The last lens on our ultra-wide zoom lens list is the EF 17-40mm f/4L USM. Think of this lens as the compromise lens between the high-priced EF 16-35mm f/2.8L II USM and the consumer-grade EF-S 10-22mm f/3.5-4.5 USM. This is still a pro series (L series) lens and still offers a great wide angle zoom range. For cameras that are not full framed, this is the focal length equivalent of a 27-64mm lens while still retaining the fast (but not real fast) f/4 maximum aperture. I like this lens and use it often. I find it to be a high-quality lens for a relatively low price. You can purchase this lens for about $700-$850 US. While not as wide as the 10-22mm lens mentioned above, I’ve never found myself too limited by its focal length. I highly recommend this lens as a good “walking around lens” because its range is going to work for a variety of assignments.

In the next installment, we’ll discuss Canon’s wide angle prime lenses.

Good luck and keep shooting!

Places to Go on the Web – Great Photo Sites Issue 13

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I love photography. Not only do I love to take photographs, I love to talk, teach, and explore photography. I also like to look at great photographs to get ideas on how I can be a better photographer.
If you have any interest in digital photography, then a visit to some of these sites is worth your time. Looking at great photos will help make your own photos better because you can get ideas, tips and see what and how others are photographing their subjects. As your cruise Cyberspace, spend a few minutes looking at these Websites:

Stephen Frink: Canon Explorer of Light photographer Stephen Frink is one of the most published underwater photographers in the world. His client list includes Mercury Marine, Victoria’s Secret, Canon and Nikon.

Roderick Angle: New York photographer Roderick Angle’s images have a unique, realistic tone that utilizes colors in a way that isn’t overwhelming. Check out his “Current Projects” gallery.

Craig Orsini: Boston photographer Craig Orsini’s client list is as eclectic as his photography. His client’s include: Merril Lynch, Atari, ESPN the Magazine and Kawasaki.