BrickHouse Photo School

Tips, Tricks and Reviews for Photo Hobbyists

Posts Tagged ‘Web

Astrophotography: The Beautiful Images from the Hubble Space Telescope

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Probably since the beginning of time, we have looked at the night sky and wondered, “what’s up there?”

Star-Birth Clouds M16: Stellar “eggs” emerge from a molecular cloud. (Photo Credit: NASA, ESA, STScl, J. Hester and P. Scowen, Arizona State University)

Star-Birth Clouds M16: Stellar “eggs” emerge from a molecular cloud. (Photo Credit: NASA, ESA, STScl, J. Hester and P. Scowen, Arizona State University)

Space and its mysteries have been the topic of books, movies, comic books, poems and songs. But thanks to technology in imaging, we are able to see what composes the our universe.

The Hubble Space Telescope has recorded images that not only provide scientists with valuable information about the universe, but also are artistic masterpieces. The HST is a space-based telescope that was launched in 1990 by the U.S. Space Agency. It is located 380 miles above the Earth. In its first 15 years, it has recorded 700,000 images. More than 4,000 peer-reviewed papers based on Hubble data have been published.

The HST moves around Earth at about 5 miles per second. To compare, if a car could travel that fast, a road trip from LA to New York City would take about 10 minutes. It completes its orbit of the Earth in 97 minutes and travels more than 150 million miles every year.

The images captured by Hubble have been featured in multiple magazines and websites. While many enjoy the images, some people wonder about the color of the photos taken by the HST. An explanation is given that these are false colors used to show differences and separate the various elements of the subject.

From the Website, “Taking color pictures with the Hubble Space Telescope is much more complex than taking color pictures with a traditional camera. For one thing, Hubble doesn’t use color film — in fact, it doesn’t use film at all. Rather, its cameras record light from the universe with special electronic detectors. These detectors produce images of the cosmos not in color, but in shades of black and white. Finished color images are actually combinations of two or more black-and-white exposures to which color has been added during image processing. The colors in Hubble images, which are assigned for various reasons, aren’t always what we’d see if we were able to visit the imaged objects in a spacecraft. We often use color as a tool, whether it is to enhance an object’s detail or to visualize what ordinarily could never be seen by the human eye.”

Furthermore, filters are used to recreate colors as explained, “Many full-color Hubble images are combinations of three separate exposures — one each taken in red, green, and blue light. When mixed together, these three colors of light can simulate almost any color of light that is visible to human eyes. That’s how televisions, computer monitors, and video cameras recreate colors.”

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Written by jeremyparce

April 27, 2009 at 7:54 am

Great Ads Use Great Photography Part II

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I love advertising/commercial photography. It’s one of the most creative forms of photography there is and in today’s marketplace, advertising photographers have to be in fifth-gear all the time.

While you may not be an ad shooter and may not even aspire to be, you can get some great ideas looking at the work. Here’s a look at some of my favorites.


docwithoutborder
Client: Doctors Without Borders
Advertising Agency: Lowe Pirella Fronzoni, Milan, Italy
Photographer: Francesco Bozza
Published: November 2008
Tagline: We cannot wave the white flag. We need that, too.

stephensbrothers
Product: Stephens Brothers, London
Advertising Agency: ideas@work, Mumbai, India
Photographer: Tejal Patni
Tagline: Let’s just say, Prince William would approve … Impeccably English.

nikons60
Product: Nikon S60
Advertising Agency: Euro RSCG
Photographer: Jeremy Wong
Tagline: The Nikon S60. Detects up to 12 faces

Places to Go on the Web – Great Photo Sites Issue 14

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I love photography. Not only do I love to take photographs, I love to talk, teach, and explore photography. I also like to look at great photographs to get ideas on how I can be a better photographer.
If you have any interest in digital photography, then a visit to some of these sites is worth your time. Looking at great photos will help make your own photos better because you can get ideas, tips and see what and how others are photographing their subjects. As your cruise Cyberspace, spend a few minutes looking at these Websites:

Dave Moser: Dave Moser has what has to be one of the coolest Websites on the planet but it even pales in comparison to his photographic work. As you navigate the fish bowl (you’ve just gotta see it to believe it) you will be increasingly amazed at the quality of his work. Moser uses color multiplied by 10. His client list includes: ING, GlaxoSmithKline, The Boeing Company, Temple University and Gap.

John Scarpati: Nashville-based photographer John Scarpati is THE musicians photographer. The Dixie Chicks, Clay Walker, Gin Blossoms, Jane’s Addiction, Rolling Stones and many, many more musicians have all had camera time with him. His images are perfect and his ability to blend personalities with light and color is simply amazing. This is a Website you can spend hours looking at.

Written by jeremyparce

April 21, 2009 at 7:30 am

Photo Critique 14: ‘Perfect Hideaway,’ by Adri O.

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I love critiquing photos. It’s the best way to learn and get new ideas for photo shoots. Today, we’re going to critique an image made by Adri, my friend in Venezuela.

"Perfect Hideaway," by Adri. O. of Venezuela

"Perfect Hideaway," by Adri. O. of Venezuela

General Overview:
Adri, I really enjoy this image. I can see this image being used for advertising. It has a nice, weathered look. I love the texture on the weathered beach chair and the way it compliments the texture of the rocks. I also like the use of color in this image. It’s a nice, soothing blue tone that helps tie in the beach chair, the ocean and the sky.
This is a nice image. Good job.

Improvements
Here are a few improvements I think will make the image better: First, I think the image would look better if the beach chair filled the entire bottom right corner of the image. I think this will help set the tone for the image a little better. I also think it would help tie in the blue in the chair, the blue in the sky and the blue in the sea a little more.

Cropping and some adjustments to the color saturation makes the image standout a little more. (Photo Credit: Adri O., with edit by Jeremy Schneider)

Cropping and some adjustments to the color saturation makes the image standout a little more. (Photo Credit: Adri O., with edit by Jeremy Schneider)

Secondly, I think the hotspot in the middle of the chair needs to be toned down just a little. Perhaps the use of a polarizing filter or a neutral density filter will help. If you don’t have a ND filter or a polarizer, then I would suggest a little editing in Photoshop help smooth out the blown highlights.

Finally, I think you should edit the photos so the colors pop a little more.

Adri, keep up the good work. Your portfolio is expanding.

Thanks for the submission, good luck and keep shooting!

If you would like to submit a photo for critique, e-mail us at submissions@brickhousephotoschool.com.

Written by jeremyparce

April 21, 2009 at 7:06 am

Jonathan Singer Photographs Flowers With a Heavenly Touch

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Jonathan Singer’s flower images have been called a marriage of art and science. Dr. Singer is a botanical photographic artist whose images of plant life is awe inspiring.

Jonathan Singer in front of his photograph of a Hippeastrum ‘Toscana,’ a new hybrid amaryllis. (Photo Credit: Howard Schatz via the artist’s Website)

Jonathan Singer in front of his photograph of a Hippeastrum ‘Toscana,’ a new hybrid amaryllis. (Photo Credit: Howard Schatz via the artist’s Website)

His credits include being named a consulting photographer to both the U.S. National Arboretum and the U.S. Botanical Gardens; a guest lecturer in photography at the NYU Tisch School of the Arts; and the first American photographer/artist to speak and have a handmade book accepted in the Swedish Royal Academy of Science.

Click here to view an interview with Singer offered by CBS News.

Written by jeremyparce

April 21, 2009 at 6:27 am

Photographers You Should Know: Sebastião Salgado

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Information for this article came from The Guardian.

Brazilian photographer Sebastião Salgado’s took a indirect path to his photography career. He initially trained as an economist, earning a master’s degree in economics from University of São Paulo and working for the International Coffee Organization.

Rwandan refugees at the hospital, run by a team of the Dutch branch of Médecins sans Frontières, Camp at Katale, Zaire. 1994. (Photo Credit: Sebastião Salgado/AMAZONAS Images/CONTACT Press Images.)

Rwandan refugees at the hospital, run by a team of the Dutch branch of Médecins sans Frontières, Camp at Katale, Zaire. 1994. (Photo Credit: Sebastião Salgado/AMAZONAS Images/CONTACT Press Images.)

It was during his tenure with the ICO, he traveled extensively to Africa on missions for the World Bank, which is when he started taking photographs. In 1973, at the age of 29, he stopped working as an economist and began his photography career. Also at that time, he moved to Paris with his family.

Born February 8, 1944 in Aimorés, which is in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazi,, Salgado’s primary photographic emphasis is on workers in less developed nations. He has published four books that encompass his long-term, self-assigned projects: The Other Americas, Sahel, Workers and Migration.

Salgado has also worked with the nonprofit humanitarian organization Doctors Without Borders on a 18-month project documenting the African famine. This work led to the production of the Sahel book, which was about a man he met while producing the documentary. The books and a number of photographic exhibitions were created from this project.

Salgado is also a UNICEF Goodwill Ambassador and an honorary member of the Academy of Arts and Sciences in the USA. He has also received numerous honorary doctorates and awards for his photographic works including the International Center of Photography’s Photojournalist of the Year in 1988 and the Ema and Victor Hasselblad Award for Life Achievement in 1989.

Places to Go on the Web – Great Photo Sites Issue 13

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I love photography. Not only do I love to take photographs, I love to talk, teach, and explore photography. I also like to look at great photographs to get ideas on how I can be a better photographer.
If you have any interest in digital photography, then a visit to some of these sites is worth your time. Looking at great photos will help make your own photos better because you can get ideas, tips and see what and how others are photographing their subjects. As your cruise Cyberspace, spend a few minutes looking at these Websites:

Stephen Frink: Canon Explorer of Light photographer Stephen Frink is one of the most published underwater photographers in the world. His client list includes Mercury Marine, Victoria’s Secret, Canon and Nikon.

Roderick Angle: New York photographer Roderick Angle’s images have a unique, realistic tone that utilizes colors in a way that isn’t overwhelming. Check out his “Current Projects” gallery.

Craig Orsini: Boston photographer Craig Orsini’s client list is as eclectic as his photography. His client’s include: Merril Lynch, Atari, ESPN the Magazine and Kawasaki.